Focusing on Māori Design Principles

The 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference in Wellington provides the opportunity for a diversity of conversations on our urban environments. Taking place Monday 14 May and Tuesday 15 May, the conference includes 10 feature speakers, 28 sessions, 4 panels, networking events and study tours in Christchurch, Auckland and Wellington. To register www.urbanismnz.co.nz

PLENARY Speaker Monday 14 May

Dr Rebecca Kiddle, Co-chair Pōneke for Ngā Aho, Senior Lecturer Environmental Studies, Victoria University of Wellington: Values and Justice in the Urban Realm – clearly articulating Māori values in urban contexts will become more urgent as Aotearoa becomes more urbanised and impacted by the ubiquity of globalisation.

LIVE Session Presentation Tuesday 15 May

Tracy Ogden-Cork, Director Motu Design: Te Wero: responding to different cultural viewpoints on land, community and housing – Māori and Pasifika families are under-represented in the design and decision-making segment of the development industry and over-represented in homelessness and deprivation statistic.

COMMUNITY & IDENTITY Session Presentation Monday 14 May

Ruby Watson, Co-Founder AKAU: Authentic Community Engagement in Aotearoa – ĀKAU engages taitamariki and their communities in real architecture and design projects, with a vision to create awesomeness in communities throughout Aotearoa.

CASE STUDIES Session Presentation Tuesday 15 May

Jade Kake, Principal Programme and Design Te Matapihi – National Maori Housing Advocate; and Jacqueline Paul, Graduate Landscape Architect: Evaluating the application of Māori design principles to urban regeneration projects – Te Aranga principles are a set of seven urban design principles that are increasing being used to produce culturally-based projects that engage positively with mana whenua cultural narratives and enhance sense of place relationships.

 

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Tracy Ogden-Cork, Ruby Watson, Jade Kake and Dr Rebecca Kiddle

 

For more information www.urbanismnz.co.nz 

Conference sponsors: Wellington City Council, Urban Design Forum, Jasmax, Isthmus, Boffa Miskell and the NZ Transport Agency.

Christchurch, Children and Consequences in Design

Broad subject areas involving the regeneration of Christchurch, safe and socially connected children as well as rules and objectives form the topics of this DESIGN session at the 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference 14 – 15 May in Wellington. To hear these speakers and more, register today at www.urbanismnz.co.nz

Regeneration in the Red Zone

Hugh Nicholson is the Design Lead for Regenerate Christchurch responsible for developing plans for the Residential Red Zone. As a result of ground damage caused by the Canterbury earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 more than 5,500 houses were removed from land along the Otakaro Avon River and South Shore. In this presentation Hugh will discuss how the collaborative planning and design processes for the future ‘red zone’ offer an opportunity to consider what a resilient 21st century city might look like. As the principal urban designer at the Christchurch City Council after the earthquakes, Hugh played a leading role in subsequent recovery planning and the hugely successful ‘Share an Idea’ public engagement campaign.

Child Centred Design

The presence of happy, healthy, safe and socially connected children is a great indicator of the success of a neighbourhood. Haylea Muir, Associate, Isthmus Group and Hayley Fitchett, Manager Masterplanning and Urban Design, HLC will present their philosophy around designing for children and their whanau in higher density homes and neighbourhoods. Haylea Muir is an experienced Residential Masterplanner and has written a number of award winning architecture and landscape design guidelines. She has a special interest in how people live, play and connect. Hayley Fitchett is a master planner, design manager and urban designer with 19 years in the property development industry within NZ and the EMEA. She has prepared strategies for the development and/or management of sites in 15 countries.

Counter Intuitive

In our drive to improve the urban realm, have we created overly simplistic rules that are now hindering good place making, however well intentioned? Matthew Prasad, Associate Urban Designer, Woods discusses some of the unintended consequences of these oversimplified rules and objectives and the challenges encountered in delivering solutions that are not in keeping with those same rules and objectives. Matthew’s passion is ‘creating human environments – spaces that are innovative, beautiful, exciting, cost-effective and practical’.

 

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Hugh Nicholson, Matthew Prasad, Haylea Muir and Hayley Fitchett

 

For more information on the conference www.urbanismnz.co.nz

Conference sponsors: Wellington City Council, Urban Design Forum, Jasmax, Isthmus, Boffa Miskell and the NZ Transport Agency.

Sharing Urban Wisdom

Barnaby Bennett talks matters urban with Dr Elizabeth Farrelly. Both are speaking at the 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference. To register www.urbanismnz.co.nz

A Remarkable Career

Elizabeth Farrelly has had a remarkable career. She has been a designer, Adjunct Associate Professor, Sydney City Councillor, and is the author of six books. To say she is award-winning is something of an understatement with an array of celebrated acknowledgements that starts early in her career and continues unabated. Along the way she’s earned a PhD, received design excellence and teaching awards, and the Marion Mahony Griffin Prize. More recently Farrelly has taken on the role of being a Weekly op-ed columnist for the Sydney Morning Herald and is one of the few prominent commentators in Australia that talks intelligently about design, public space, cities and architecture. Farrelly is a long-term resident, and scholar, of Sydney and returns to her homeland for the upcoming Urbanism New Zealand conference.

Sharing Wisdom

As New Zealand embarks on one of the most substantial housing and transportation construction periods in its history, it’s an appropriate moment for Farrelly to share her wisdom about Australia cities and how NZ might learn from their mistakes and successes. I recently sat down with Elizabeth and talked about cities, walking, and the dangers of utilitarian solutions.

Walking Through Cities

It’s clear when talking to Farrelly about cities that she experiences them, and prioritises the experience of them, as a pedestrian, as someone that loves walking through cities, a Flaneur. Her diagnoses of the problems of cities in relation to complex issues such as heritage, development, transport are imbued with this notion of walking. This isn’t the contemporary science of walkability, but a more productive notion of cities as places that create moments that surprise, reveal, and fulfil the people that live there. It’s evident in her various roles that she has always resisted the temptation to treat cities simply, and so her notions of surprise, delight and the creation of meaning through experiences of space have not become romanticised, translated into dumb rules or treated with lost nostalgia. Rather through her actions as a councillor in implementing protections for laneways, and as part of generating sophisticated planning rules, and through her regular teaching and writing, she has reminded the city that these more poetic and cultural experiences of cities are at the core of urbanism, not an accidental benefit.

Protection of Public Interest

The central thread that Farrelly kept returning turned to in our conversation was the question of how to best protect this rich and complex notion of ‘public interest’. Her current interest is in arguing for the city to be understood ‘as an animal with symbolic resonance for people’. As something that is ‘representative of identity’, in the sense that it gives meaning to the people that live within it. This is a notion that she thinks has been abandoned as we instead buy into 20th-century ideas about ‘the city as a machine’ in which ‘a utilitarian approach has become the dominant paradigm’. There is a tricky balancing act between addressing the failures of the city and not destroying the village to save the village. The warnings for a government intent on fixing contemporary problems in NZ cities couldn’t be clearer.

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Dr Elizabeth Farrelly and Barnaby Bennett are both speaking at the 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference 14 to 15 May in Wellington. For more info www.urbanismnz.co.nz

POP Panel to discuss Key Issue Areas

The People of Purpose (POP) Panel at the 2018 Urbanism Conference will focus on the critical issues for urbanism in New Zealand in their identification of the key areas to bring about change in our built environment.

Moderated by journalist Rod Oram, the panel members are:

  • Ben van Bruggen, Manager Urban Design Strategy, Auckland Council
  • Dr Jessica Halliday, Te Putahi Christchurch Centre for Architecture and City Making
  • Justin Lester, Mayor, Wellington City Council
  • Connal Townsend, Chief Executive, NZ Property Council
  • Adrienne Young-Cooper, Chairman of the Board, Housing New Zealand

Through discussion and questions from conference delegates, Rod Oram will be challenging the panel members to seek consensus on issues connecting the sector as a whole. Once identified, these key issue areas will be reviewed and debated throughout the two days of the conference with the aim of directing future change.

To join the conversation, REGISTER as a delegate or profile your organisation as a SPONSOR.

Early Bird Registration closes Monday 9 April. PROGRAM information on the website.

Our Panel Members

Ben van Bruggen is an urban planner, designer and urbanist with 25 years experience and has bheadshot v2een involved in leading urbanism projects in China, Russia and Montenegro as well as the UK. He recently joined the Auckland Design Office from the UK where he is the founding director of van Bruggen Limited and was Head of Urban Design at Savills

Dr Jessica Halliday’s passion is finding ways for more and more people to engage and involve themselves with cities, architecture and the deJessica-Halliday-Portrait_v3cisions made about our built environment. Jessica is an architectural historian and is the Director and co-founder of Te Pūtahi – Christchurch centre for architecture and city-making, a charitable organisation dedicated to growing people and places together.

Justin Lester was elected Mayor in 2016. He joined Wellington City Council as a Northern Ward Councillor in 2010 and then served as Deputy MaJustin Lester for Mayor 2016 campaign photographyyor from 2013 until 2016. During his time as a Councillor, Justin championed the living wage, prioritised good quality local services and supported local businesses. He feels strongly that good local government services make a huge difference in people’s lives

As Chief Executive of Property Council New Zealand since 2004, Connal Townsend is the industry’s principal advocConnal_v2ate for New Zealand’s commercial, industrial, retail, property funds and multi-unit residential property owners.

Adrienne Young-Cooper is a qualified planner, now retired and working as a full time non-executive director on the AYC pic_from AYCboards of several organisations and businesses. She chairs the board of Housing New Zealand and is on the board of its wholly owned subsidiary, HLC formerly the Hobsonville Land Company.

The 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference major sponsors are the Wellington City Council, Urban Design Forum, Jasmax, Isthmus and Boffa Miskell. 

 

 

 

Study Tours in Wellington, Christchurch and Auckland

On the weekend prior to the 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference delegates have the opportunity to book and attend multiple study tours available in Christchurch, Auckland and Wellington.

The tours are being held on either Saturday 12 May or Sunday 13 May with some tours available for booking on both days. For more information visit Study Tours.

Christchurch 

Tour 1 is a walking tour of the Central City showcasing the unique opportunities and challenges that arose from the earthquakes. Delegates will discover thChristchurche anchor projects completed or underway. Tour 2 Field Trip enables delegates to experience the ‘residential red zone’. The combination of land subsidence and lateral spread have created a case study on how coastal cities around the world might adapt to sea level rise.

Auckland

Tour 1 is a waterfront walking tour of the Auckland CBD and visiting the Wynyard Quarter redevelopment. The “A for Effort But Could Do Better” walking Tour auckland2 is of a redevelopment location in the very early stages of work, looking at it from a masterplanning perspective. Tour 3 is ‘Welcome to Our Place’: Hobsonville Point – a peninsula that juts out into the Waitemata Harbour, a 20 minute drive northwest of Auckland’s CBD. Until recently a defence base, it is now being developed for all Aucklanders.

Wellington

Sponsored by Boffa Miskell, the e-bike Cycle Tour takes delegates around the wbike touraterfront, visiting sites of urban development that have helped shaped Wellington. The group will stop for a refreshment at the locally renowned Chocolate Fish Café, before returning to the city centre via Mt Victoria, assisted by your electric bike. On Tour 2 delegates are joined by Wellington City Council representatives for a short walking tour of the CBD looking at key sites.

The 2018 Urbanism Conference in Wellington from 14 to 15 May 2018 is focused on shaping New Zealand’s cities and places by the sector collectively identifying the key issues to bring about change. Early Bird Registration closes Monday 9 April.

 

 

Elizabeth Farrelly announced as Opening Speaker

Sydney-based columnist, broadcaster, author and critic on architecture and public issues, Dr Elizabeth Farrelly has been added to the Program for the 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference. Providing the opening presentation, Dr Farrelly trained in architecture and philosophy, practiced in London and Bristol and holds a PhD in urbanism from the University of Sydney, where she is also a former Adjunct Associate Professor.

Elizabeth Farrelly
Dr Elizabeth Farrelly

 

As an independent Sydney City Councillor, Elizabeth initiated Sydney’s first heritage and laneway protection policies, and was inaugural chair of the Australia Award for Urban Design (1998). She was also Manager Special Projects at the City of Sydney during the Olympic preparations. Born in New Zealand, Dr Farrelly is an award-winning writer and published author.

Full details of the Conference Program is now available. Save up to $275 with Early Bird registration also special conference rates for accommodation. Conference includes networking events and study tours in Christchurch, Auckland and Wellington.

Conference sponsors: Wellington City Council, Urban Design Forum, Jasmax, Isthmus and Boffa Miskell.

Review Program Now Available

Following the review of a high number of abstracts submitted by authors from across the country, the Program for the 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference is now available.

The  two day preliminary Program is available here 2018 Urbanism NZ Prelim Program_5March

More detail on the speakers and their presentations can also be bike riderfound on the conference website Agenda.

With a program that includes over 50 speakers, 5 panels, key sector specialists from across New Zealand in addition to networking events and study tours in Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington, this is an event focused on driving change within our urban settlements.

Register as a delegate now. Early Bird closes 9 April.

Conference sponsors: Wellington City Council, Urban Design Forum, Jasmax, Isthmus and Boffa Miskell.

‘Well-Tempered City’ Author joins our Speakers Program

Jonathan F.P. Rose, author on how to create resilient cities and founder of the Jonathan Rose Companies  will be participating in the speakers program at the 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference. Joining the program line-up from his base in New York, Mr Rose will present on the issues he discusses in his book The Well-Tempered City: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilisations and Human Nature Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life in addition to undertaking Q&A with our delegates.

Jon Rose linked in image
Jonathan F.P.Rose

 

Mr Rose’s business, public policy and not-for-profit work all focus on creating more environmentally, socially and economically resilient cities. In 1989 he founded Jonathan Rose Companies LLC, a multi-disciplinary real estate development, planning and investment firm, which creates real estate and planning models to address the challenges of the 21st century.

His firm’s work touches on many aspects of community health, working with cities and not-for-profits to build affordable and mixed-income housing, cultural, health and educational infrastructure, and advocates for neighbourhoods to be enriched with parks and open space, mass transit, jobs and healthy food.

The Well-Tempered City won the 2017 PROSE Award for Outstanding Scholarly Work by a Trade Publisher and Mr Rose lectures on affordable housing, community development, smart growth and the environment.

Jonathan F.P. Rose joins our feature speakers Christina van Bohemen, Justin Lester, Connal Townsend, Adrienne Young-Cooper, Nigel McKenna, Ludo Campbell-Reid, Patrick Reynolds, Dr Rebecca Kiddle, James Lunday and the Minister of Housing and Urban Development Hon Phil Twyford.

SAVE on Early Bird Registration OPEN NOW.

Be involved in this leading collective discussion on urbanism. CALL FOR PAPERS submission deadline extended to Friday 16 February.

The 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference gold sponsors are the Wellington City Council and the Urban Design Forum with bronze sponsors Jasmax and Isthmus.

Call for Papers Open

There is a conversation that has been missing in New Zealand – discussion which inform our urban settlements is not being collectively debated.

The 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference is an outcome driven event focusing on shaping New Zealand’s cities and places by identifying the key issues. To join the discussion that forms the basis of an issues paper to be presented to our national decision makers, submit your abstract for consideration by the conference advisory committee.

Issues to be discussed include questions around the economic drivers that shape cities and towns; how are they managed through New Zealand’s central government and local authorities; influence of planning regimes; resilience within community; role of urban design; residential supply and demand; effect of city leadership philosophy as well as policy; urban ecology; identity and heritage; development and delivery; how are infrastructure systems such as transport and utilities shaping settlement patterns; and is the quality of building, places and architecture important.

Feature speakers include Urban Design Champion for AucklandLudo Campbell-Reid; Mayor of Wellington CityJustin Lester; NZIA President – Christina van Bohemen; Chief Executive Property Council NZ – Connal Townsend; Urban Designer Regenerate Christchurch – James Lunday; and Urban Advocate – Patrick Reynolds.